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    Question Well, hello!! - and guidance sought...

    drywallschool.com

    I first became familiar with drylining whilst building our timber-frame house back in the early 70's. The technique was joint filler(air hardening); joint finish(hardens by evaporation, so could be retempered) and a joint sponge to feather joints and apply a slurry of joint finish to achieve a consistent surface texture. This served me well for the myriad diy jobs I encountered until my latest project, when I found that joint filler and finish were no longer available.
    So, I learnt about Easifill and set about my work - but I have a dilemma!
    Working with easifill is fine but, how do I get the consistent surface texture that I used to get?
    Any advice/guidance would be much appreciated.
    petey

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    Season ticket holder amestaper's Avatar
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    Hi Pete. Both products are still available, they may just be called something else to what you used then. You could always knock up some thin joint cement and apply with a sponge/brush and short pile roller to achieve a similar finish? This has worked for me.
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    Amestaper - thnx for your response. The products I used were Gyproc Joint Filler & Finish - what are the 21st century equivalents? I seem to remember having a go with an easifill slurry - without much success, I guess. Might have a go with a roller. What still intrigues me is that the issue of evening out the surface texture doesn't get addressed in the White Book. Have I missed something or is there a follow-up stage in the process?

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    U could always use a sealer 2 help make it all the same!!!

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    Gyproc joint filler and joint cement are still available, most brands name their filler "joint filler" but their finnish can be called by different names like "joint cement, easysand, lafarge velvet." Slurrying has had its day and been replaced by sealing with Drywall sealer oddly enough.

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    This will give your surface the even texture you desire. It is pricey though!
    Welcome to the forum
    Last edited by E.K Taper; 13-02-2013 at 10:32 PM.

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    Season ticket holder amestaper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petey View Post
    Amestaper - thnx for your response. The products I used were Gyproc Joint Filler & Finish - what are the 21st century equivalents? I seem to remember having a go with an easifill slurry - without much success, I guess. Might have a go with a roller. What still intrigues me is that the issue of evening out the surface texture doesn't get addressed in the White Book. Have I missed something or is there a follow-up stage in the process?
    The Yanks have it sorted as they use a level 1 to 5 scale thats documented in our downloads section somewhere. Level 1 is fire taped and Level 5 is able to take a high gloss finish as its been sprayed. See the other suggestions for drywall primer or sealer as that should provide the finish youre looking for.
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    Thnx all for your comments. I guess my worry has been answered in a roundabout way - I'm a cheap b*****d and was looking for a less expensive way of finishing. I'd sussed out the availability of Drywall Sealer and Primer, but assumed that I could get away with priming with 5:1 PVA. Which of the 2 will give me the finish?

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    Primer doesnt give you a finnish good taping does. I work for a builder who only uses PVA he says apart from being cheaper he gets a better finnish.

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    You know you could save time and use any water based latex primer straight from the tub? I've used all types, and mixed my own slurry but considered the Leyland Super Leytex at 20 odd bucks for 15 litres equally as good as the Gyproc brand stuff. It covers around 200m2 when pissed up with water.

    Labour cost me more than materials so what you may think you are saving in cash by making your own PVA mix is actually costing you more time.
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