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    Default Floating down a ceiling...


    Hi all, I'm new to this forum, and have a question.

    First off, I'm a DIY guy but am (fairly) knowledgable and experienced. I've hung a fair share of drywall and done finishing and texture. Not by any means a pro, but I'd say pretty knowledgable for a regular guy.

    Here's my question:

    I'm remodeling my master shower, and just finished all the tile. I ended up with a full tile at the ceiling. The problem is that even though the one side has a roughly 1/8"-1/4" (didn't measure) gap between the last tile and ceiling(which is perfect), the ceiling is not level and the opposite end has a roughly 1/4"-1/2" gap. After debating all the solutions, I've decided the best one is to float the ceiling down and feather it in to the center of the room. I really don't have another option that won't look like a hackjob/afterthought.

    So, when floating down the ceiling do I need to be concerned about going directly on top of paint/orange peel? I'm slightly worried about it bonding well, especially building up almost 1/2" in some areas. Is there anything special I need to do(sand the ceiling, score it, apply a primer, etc) before applying the joint compound?

    Thank you very much!

    BTW, I will be retexturing it with orange peel then painting, of course.

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    Default

    Here's a pic, for reference.




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    Default

    Personally I would screw some 9mm plasterboard on top of whats already there and re-do the ceiling from scratch.

    If thats not possible, you could also rough it up with sandpaper to give a good key then apply a generous coat of a gritty bonding agent.
    Check out the FeBond range out on Ebay --> http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/17077...f13=80&ff14=83

    Be careful using only PVA, there will be steam in there so you need to make sure that joint cement sticks.

    Just my 2p worth.
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    Thanks for the response. I had thought about adding a layer of drywall, but the ceiling would still not be level. It would probably look OK as it would cover the gap difference, but I just figured it'd be better to level the ceiling and make it "right". Also, I'd maybe have to lower my light, fan, etc. Not a huge deal but to me just seems the "right" way to do it is level the ceiling.

    I can certainly roughen it up with sand paper, that's no issue. I need help figuring out what product to use as a bonding agent, as I'm not at all familiar with them. Maybe someone can chime it that might know what I can use here in the states.

    My intent was to basically use a notched trowel(like for tile) to get an even depth to the joint compound. Then fill it in with a second coat. Then if I need more thickness do the same thing again. This way it will not be wavy, and I'd think this might help it dry/bond better doing it in thinner layers.

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    I suppose a US equivalent of this product would be Plaster Weld? www.larsenproducts.com/plasterweld.php

    As I am not from there, I would ask advice at a DIY shop or builders merchant as there may be better products available. Basically you need to have a sound surface free from cracks or loose paint etc, then applying a primer and bonding agent will give your joint compound something to grip to.

    I have to say again, steam and condensation would be my biggest concern. I would screw up some 9mm drywall or pull the old one down then re-sheet it correctly. A professional tradesman could frame and level that up for you and I would recommend employing one if in any doubt.
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    Thanks for your response.

    I wish I had more than just one opinion on the matter though. lol. I might just finish the shower(need to grout it) and see how bad it looks then go from there. I can always add another layer of drywall after I have finished the rest of the work. It seems like it's a bad idea to mud it and float it down that thick in a damp area...

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    Why not mitre cut some decorative dado rail into the corner and put it up like coving to cover the gap and then silicone top and bottom? Cut a left and right external mitre to return into the wall past where your tiles stop and cut 2 stop ends, same as if you were coving. I'd stick it up with mitre bond. Take about 20 mins. I've done this to solve the same problem, looks fine, paint with bit of satinwood.
    Save a lot of dicking about re-levelling ceilings and jointing!

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    I tried playing around with some crown molding but it just looked tacky to me, looked like a bandaid or an afterthought. Luckily the bathroom is small(only about 6'x6' or so), so I'm going to mud it down. I have the shower 100% finished now, I just need to do the ceiling and I'm done. I'm going to sand it to roughen it up, maybe try to score it so it will bond better, not sure what to use to score it though, maybe a v notch trowel. I don't know what else to do, I can't come up with a "great" solution. The only other thing I think would work well is to add another layer of drywall, either 1/4" or 1/2", probably 1/2". This would be easier and I know it will last, but decreases the height of the room(not sure 1/2" will be noticeable at all)

    The main reason the crown didn't work is because of the pencil trim, it looked really tacky where they met.

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    Quote Originally Posted by snrusnak View Post
    I tried playing around with some crown molding but it just looked tacky to me, looked like a bandaid or an afterthought. Luckily the bathroom is small(only about 6'x6' or so), so I'm going to mud it down. I have the shower 100% finished now, I just need to do the ceiling and I'm done. I'm going to sand it to roughen it up, maybe try to score it so it will bond better, not sure what to use to score it though, maybe a v notch trowel. I don't know what else to do, I can't come up with a "great" solution. The only other thing I think would work well is to add another layer of drywall, either 1/4" or 1/2", probably 1/2". This would be easier and I know it will last, but decreases the height of the room(not sure 1/2" will be noticeable at all)

    The main reason the crown didn't work is because of the pencil trim, it looked really tacky where they met.
    Use thistle 1 coat plaster then scim it with readymix u will b fine!

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    Thanks, here's what I did:

    I scraped off most of the paint and ceiling texture about 6"-12" from the corner. Then hit with a sanding block real quick. Then I bought some of the powdered mud mix in a bag I think it's commonly referred to as "hot" mud. I guess this stuff won't shrink like the preblended stuff. I'm going to do about 2 or 3 thinner coats to get the thickness I need, and feather it out about 18" away from the wall. Going to hope for the best as far as bond. I read a lot online saying as long as you remove the paint and don't use preblended mud it will be ok.

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    More chance of the hot mud leaving than the ready mix!!!!
    White glue in it will sort it!!

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    More chance of the hot mud leaving than the ready mix!!!!
    White glue in it will sort it!!
    Can you please explain? Everyone I talked to said not to use the premix stuff, and to use the "hot mud" (bagged powder mix).

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    Quote Originally Posted by snrusnak View Post
    Can you please explain? Everyone I talked to said not to use the premix stuff, and to use the "hot mud" (bagged powder mix).
    There is no glue in the hotmud so if its going onto a painted surface the chances of it not sticking r real high!! Readymix will stick 2 anything!!
    But throw in white glue it should b fine!

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    Thank you for your help. Which of these options are my best in your opinion:

    1) use the hot mud as is with no glue added (I've scraped off the paint and ceiling texture about 6"-12" off the corner and will be feathering the mud out about 18" off the corner). I could scrape more paint/texture off also.

    2) same as 1 but add glue (what kind of glue? like elmers?)

    3) buy premixed all purpose mud in a 5 gallon bucket and use that as is

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    Ok what I did was mixed the hot mud and put some elmer's glue in it. I didn't know how much so I used about 1/4-1/2 a small bottle for half a bag. Don't know if it helped but it went on the wall just fine.

    Question, the areas that are very thick aren't "drying" (curing, I think is the proper term...). The edges where it's thin hardened and "dried" within a couple hours at the most (I'm using 45 min mud). The rest of it also got hard within an hour or so, but even days later it's still grey and when trying to sand it it's kind of "chunky" and pliable, and just immediately clogs the sanding block. It's hard, but it's not white and I really can't sand it. What gives?

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    Quote Originally Posted by snrusnak View Post
    Ok what I did was mixed the hot mud and put some elmer's glue in it. I didn't know how much so I used about 1/4-1/2 a small bottle for half a bag. Don't know if it helped but it went on the wall just fine.

    Question, the areas that are very thick aren't "drying" (curing, I think is the proper term...). The edges where it's thin hardened and "dried" within a couple hours at the most (I'm using 45 min mud). The rest of it also got hard within an hour or so, but even days later it's still grey and when trying to sand it it's kind of "chunky" and pliable, and just immediately clogs the sanding block. It's hard, but it's not white and I really can't sand it. What gives?
    2 me it sounds like its just not dried out yet but i'm not 2 sure!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by snrusnak View Post
    Hi all, I'm new to this forum, and have a question.

    First off, I'm a DIY guy but am (fairly) knowledgable and experienced. I've hung a fair share of drywall and done finishing and texture. Not by any means a pro, but I'd say pretty knowledgable for a regular guy.

    Here's my question:

    I'm remodeling my master shower, and just finished all the tile. I ended up with a full tile at the ceiling. The problem is that even though the one side has a roughly 1/8"-1/4" (didn't measure) gap between the last tile and ceiling(which is perfect), the ceiling is not level and the opposite end has a roughly 1/4"-1/2" gap. After debating all the solutions, I've decided the best one is to float the ceiling down and feather it in to the center of the room. I really don't have another option that won't look like a hackjob/afterthought.

    So, when floating down the ceiling do I need to be concerned about going directly on top of paint/orange peel? I'm slightly worried about it bonding well, especially building up almost 1/2" in some areas. Is there anything special I need to do(sand the ceiling, score it, apply a primer, etc) before applying the joint compound?

    Thank you very much!

    BTW, I will be retexturing it with orange peel then painting, of course.
    I would use a Stanley knife and score through the top paper/ paint and remove a section of it maybe 1ft just the paint and paper then level it to the 1 ft mark with bagged filler, fast set? Hot mud? Build it up with that,The only filler/ mud U want on a painted surface is finish / readymix that's all that will bond/adhere to the surface

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